Uber’s Chinese rival Didi Chuxing offers jobs in Mexico ahead of launch

Chinese ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing has advertised online for a range of jobs in Mexico as it prepares to break into the country, one of rival Uber’s regional strongholds.

Didi Chuxing plans this year to launch a smartphone app in Mexico and to recruit drivers to the platform, Reuters reported last month. The expansion underscores Didi’s growing interest in Mexico and, more broadly, Latin America, a market where Uber Technologies Inc doubled down after Didi drove it out of China.

A spokesman for Didi declined to comment. The company is the second-most highly valued, venture-backed private firm in the world, after Uber.Over the past two weeks, Didi has advertised on LinkedIn for eight jobs based in the Mexico City area, postings on the social network show.

The company is hiring for roles in government affairs, public relations, marketing and driver operations, among other fields.Uber stressed its commitment to Mexico, noting its read more

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Twin earthquakes expose Mexico’s deep inequality

Early in the morning on Sept. 16, 1810, priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla rang the bell of his church in the small town of Dolores, near Guanajuato, Mexico. His parishioners gathered round, and he urged them to revolt against Spain’s two-year-old Napoleonic government.

Hidalgo’s call to arms, which later became known later as the Grito de Dolores (Cry of Dolores), triggered the Mexican War of Independence. Every September 15, the president of Mexico takes to the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City to reenact it.

This year, just a week before Independence Day, a historic earthquake struck Mexico’s southern coast, killing nearly 100 people. So President Enrique Peña Nieto added a poignant element to his Grito by including in the incantation a reference to the impoverished states that were most devastated by read more